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Toronto cardinal calls for prayers after van kills at least 10

IMAGE: CNS photo/Carlo Allegri, Reuters

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TORONTO (CNS) -- Toronto Cardinal Thomas Collins called for special prayers after a van jumped a curb and killed at least 10 people on a busy Toronto street.

Although officials said the April 23 incident did not appear to be terrorism, they said it did appear to be deliberate. Cabinet members from leading industrialized nations were meeting in Toronto in preparation for a G-7 summit in Quebec in June.

"I invite the Catholic community across the Archdiocese of Toronto to join me in offering our prayers for all those who were killed and injured in the violent incident earlier today," the cardinal said in a statement. "I will be asking all 225 Catholic churches in the Archdiocese of Toronto to offer special prayer intentions this week for all those who have suffered. Let us all unite in our efforts to bring comfort and care to those who are hurting today."

Authorities identified the driver as Alek Minassian, who was charged with 10 counts of first-degree murder. The Associated Press reported witnesses said he appeared to intentionally jump a curb in the North York neighborhood as people filled the sidewalks on a warm afternoon. He continued for more than a mile, knocking out a fire hydrant and leaving bodies strewn in his wake.

Basilian Father Thomas Rosica, CEO of the Toronto-based Salt and Light Catholic Media Foundation, tweeted: "Death toll of today's horrific accident is now at 10 with many more in critical condition. Tonight we celebrated Mass for all who have died. Such senseless, horrible killing of many innocent people who were outside enjoying our first taste of spring. God bless Toronto tonight."

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Copyright © 2018 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Body of St. John XXIII to make brief return to his home diocese

Request for Proposals for Annual Audit of Dioceses and Eparchies for Bishops’ Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People; Sought by USCCB’s National Review Board

WASHINGTON—The National Review Board of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) are inviting applications for proposals to conduct annual audits of U.S. dioceses and eparchies to assess compliance with the bishops Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People.

The annual audits would cover a three-year cycle beginning July 1, 2019 through June 30,2022.

The Charter, first approved by the USCCB in June 2002, and revised and approved again in June 2005 and November 2011, the bishops of the United States affirmed the Church's commitment to effectively and appropriately address cases of sexual abuse of minors by priests, deacons, and other Church personnel and to reach out to victims of sexual abuse and their families. The bishops also pledged to work with parents, civil authorities, educators and various organizations in the community to create and maintain a safe environment within the Church for all children and young people.  

Article 8 of the Charter calls for appropriate audit mechanisms to determine if dioceses and eparchies are complying with the provisions of the Charter. Accordingly, annual audits have been conducted in each diocese and eparchy since 2003 to assess compliance with the Charter and, where necessary, to specify required actions that would bring the diocese/eparchy into compliance with the Charter.  Summaries of the results of these audits have been included in the Annual Report on the Implementation of the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People.  

Audits will be expected to assess not only the extent to which dioceses and eparchies have established policies, procedures, and programs in accord with the Charter, but also to review the administration of these policies, procedures, and programs. Additionally, as guidelines and measurements of effectiveness are developed over the next few years, they are to be incorporated into future audits.

Timeline:

Deadline for Letter of Intent to submit proposal: June 10, 2018.

Deadline for final proposal: August 30, 2018

Interviews: Fall 2018

The Letter of Intent must include background and relevant information regarding the firm and articulation of relevant experience. The Application must include names and resumes of detailing relevant experience and proposed methodology as well as a proposed budget.

Evaluation Criteria
There is no requirement that the audits be conducted by Catholic individuals or institutions, but the project director and the auditors should demonstrate an informed understanding of the Catholic Church and diocesan/eparchial structures. Final selection of the Auditor will be made by the Administrative Committee upon the recommendation of the National Review Board in consultation with the Committee on the Protection of Children and Young People and the Secretariat of Child and Youth Protection.

Inquiries, letters of intent, and applications should be addressed to:

Deacon Bernie Nojadera

Executive Director

Secretariat of Child and Youth Protection

3211 Fourth Street, NE

Washington, DC 20017

bnojadera@usccb.org

(202) 541-5413

The complete request for proposals can be found at: http://www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/child-and-youth-protection/upload/usccb-child-youth-protection-request-for-proposal-2020-2022.pdf.

The Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People can be found at http://www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/child-and-youth-protection/charter.cfm

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Keywords: U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, USCCB, National Review Board, Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People, clergy sex abuse, request for proposals, dioceses, eparchies, annual audit, safe environment, annual report.

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Media Contact:
Judy Keane

202-541-3200

Tuesday of the Fourth Week of Easter

Reading 1 Acts 11:19-26

Those who had been scattered by the persecution
that arose because of Stephen
went as far as Phoenicia, Cyprus, and Antioch,
preaching the word to no one but Jews.
There were some Cypriots and Cyrenians among them, however,
who came to Antioch and began to speak to the Greeks as well,
proclaiming the Lord Jesus.
The hand of the Lord was with them
and a great number who believed turned to the Lord.
The news about them reached the ears of the Church in Jerusalem,
and they sent Barnabas to go to Antioch.
When he arrived and saw the grace of God,
he rejoiced and encouraged them all
to remain faithful to the Lord in firmness of heart,
for he was a good man, filled with the Holy Spirit and faith.
And a large number of people was added to the Lord.
Then he went to Tarsus to look for Saul,
and when he had found him he brought him to Antioch.
For a whole year they met with the Church
and taught a large number of people,
and it was in Antioch that the disciples
were first called Christians.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 87:1b-3, 4-5, 6-7

R. (117:1a) All you nations, praise the Lord.
or:
R. Alleluia.
His foundation upon the holy mountains
the LORD loves:
The gates of Zion,
more than any dwelling of Jacob.
Glorious things are said of you,
O city of God!
R. All you nations, praise the Lord.
or:
R. Alleluia.
I tell of Egypt and Babylon
among those who know the LORD;
Of Philistia, Tyre, Ethiopia:
"This man was born there."
And of Zion they shall say:
"One and all were born in her;
And he who has established her
is the Most High LORD."
R. All you nations, praise the Lord.
or:
R. Alleluia.
They shall note, when the peoples are enrolled:
"This man was born there."
And all shall sing, in their festive dance:
"My home is within you."
R. All you nations, praise the Lord.
or:
R. Alleluia.

Alleliua Jn 10:27

R. Alleluia, alleluia.
My sheep hear my voice, says the Lord;
I know them, and they follow me.
R. Alleluia, alleluia.

Gospel Jn 10:22-30

The feast of the Dedication was taking place in Jerusalem.
It was winter.
And Jesus walked about in the temple area on the Portico of Solomon.
So the Jews gathered around him and said to him,
"How long are you going to keep us in suspense?
If you are the Christ, tell us plainly."
Jesus answered them, "I told you and you do not believe.
The works I do in my Father's name testify to me.
But you do not believe, because you are not among my sheep.
My sheep hear my voice;
I know them, and they follow me.
I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish.
No one can take them out of my hand.
My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all,
and no one can take them out of the Father's hand.
The Father and I are one."
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Lectionary for Mass for Use in the Dioceses of the United States, second typical edition, Copyright © 2001, 1998, 1997, 1986, 1970 Confraternity of Christian Doctrine; Psalm refrain © 1968, 1981, 1997, International Committee on English in the Liturgy, Inc. All rights reserved. Neither this work nor any part of it may be reproduced, distributed, performed or displayed in any medium, including electronic or digital, without permission in writing from the copyright owner.

Raise a cone: Rome's poor celebrate pope's name day with gelato

Raise a cone: Rome's poor celebrate pope's name day with gelato

IMAGE: CNS photo/Paul Haring

By Cindy Wooden

ROME (CNS) -- Cones raised in the air, the crowd gathered for dinner at the Sant'Egidio Community's soup kitchen toasted Pope Francis on his name day, the feast of St. George.

The gelato was offered by the pope, born Jorge Mario Bergoglio, as part of his name day celebration April 23. He provided 3,000 servings of ice cream -- mostly vanilla cones with chocolate and nuts on top, but also a few pistachio cones and a couple strawberry ones -- to soup kitchens and homeless shelters around Rome.

"It's not like gelato is the only thing he gives away," said Ruggiero, who passed on the cones because, he said, at his age -- 70-something -- "I'm watching my physique."

"Everything this pope does he does for the poor," Ruggiero told Catholic News Service. "And then there's his smile."

Alberto, roughly the same age, was seated next to Ruggiero for the dinner, which began with a course of gnocchi, then moved on to the main course of veal and potatoes and would normally have finished with fruit. Oranges were the day's offering.

"It's a very charming gesture," said Alberto as he unwrapped his cone at the kitchen in Rome's Trastevere neighborhood.

The two men, along with five other friends, had begun their evening in the tiny Church of San Calisto, where they join in singing evening prayer and prayers for peace twice a month. Then they walk to the soup kitchen nearby for dinner.

One of the seven gentlemen wrote their names in big letters on the paper place mats to save their seats. But there is always room for one more. And they take turns filling each other's water glasses, passing out the food and collecting the dirty plates before the next course.

Across the room, Antonino Siragusa was eating, but also helping to serve. He said he has met the pope "six times. He's a good person, very lively. He smiles and will meet anyone."

Before the meal began, he admitted he had not known it was the pope's name day, but he was glad to hear it.

"I love sweets," he said. "This is great!"

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Copyright © 2018 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Italy grants citizenship to Alfie Evans in attempt to guarantee his care

IMAGE: CNS/Vatican Media

By Cindy Wooden

VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- The Italian government granted citizenship to Alfie Evans, a seriously ill British toddler, in a last-minute effort to prevent doctors in England from withdrawing life-support.

The Italian foreign ministry, in a brief note April 23, said Angelino Alfano, the foreign minister, and Marco Minniti, the interior minister, "granted Italian citizenship to little Alfie."

"The Italian government hopes that being an Italian citizen would allow the immediate transfer of the baby to Italy," the foreign ministry said.

The baby's parents, Tom Evans and Kate James, lost their latest legal battle April 23 to prevent doctors from removing Alfie's life-support when the European Court of Human Rights refused to intervene.

Doctors in the U.K. have not been able to make a definitive diagnosis of the 23-month-old child's degenerative neurological condition, but they have said keeping him on life-support would be "futile."

A high court judge backed a lower court's ruling that the hospital can go against the wishes of the family and withdraw life-support.

Tom Evans flew to Rome and met Pope Francis April 18, begging the pope to help get his son "asylum" in Italy. The Vatican-owned Bambino Gesu hospital in Rome has offered to care for Alfie. Three specialists from Bambino Gesu had flown to Liverpool and examined Alfie. According to the president of Bambino Gesu, "a positive outcome would be difficult, but the baby's suffering can be alleviated."

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Copyright © 2018 Catholic News Service/U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops. www.catholicnews.com. All rights reserved. Republishing or redistributing of CNS content, including by framing or similar means without prior permission, is prohibited. You may link to stories on our public site. This copy is for your personal, non-commercial use only. To request permission for republishing or redistributing of CNS content, please contact permissions at cns@catholicnews.com.

Italy grants citizenship to Alfie Evans in attempt to guarantee his care

Pope meets with Italian pilgrims from Bologna, Cesena